Answers in genesis radiocarbon dating

Answers in genesis radiocarbon dating

And 4,500 years is less than one radiocarbon half-life, so from Figure 2 we might expect 4,500-year-old samples to have C found within organic samples thought to date from the time of the Flood is generally only about 0.1 to 0.5 p MC.

From Figure 1, a value of 0.098 ≈ 0.1 p MC corresponds to 10 half-lives, or about 57,000 years.

One of these assumptions is that nuclear decay rates have always been constant.

Although C decays fairly quickly, heavier isotopes (such as uranium-238) decay much more slowly.

Despite this apparent difficulty for the recent-creation view, this is, in fact, a much more serious problem for the old-earth view!

Second, such large calculated ages are based on the C/C ratio has remained unchanged for tens of thousands of years.

A global flood like the one described in the Bible would invalidate this assumption.

This value of 0.2 p MC is very close to the value of 0.195 p MC found within Figure 1.

About nine half-lives would have to elapse for a starting value of 100 p MC to decrease to 0.2 p MC.

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Because the present decay rates of these heavier isotopes are so small, the assumption that these rates have always been constant naturally leads to age estimates of millions and even billions of years.

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